Amputations

An amputation generally refers to removal of the whole or part of an arm, hand, leg or foot.

 

Amputations in seniors are frequently performed because the arteries of the legs have become blocked due to hardening of the arteries, a condition known as atherosclerosis. Blockages in the arteries result in insufficient blood supply to the limb. Diabetes is a condition that can cause hardening of the arteries which increases the risk of blockage. Seniors with diabetes are at risk for developing foot ulcers that can get worse and lead amputation of the toe, foot or leg. Many times, elderly persons with diabetes lose sensation in their foot and are unaware that an ulcer or foot problem has occurred until it is too late.

The good news is that these problems can usually be avoided with proper diabetes management and careful foot care. Nursing home caretakers must provide proper foot care to prevent residents from developing foot ulcers and other issues with the feet. Preventative measures include inspecting the resident’s feet daily, ensuring that residents wash their feet daily and wear clean, dry socks and appropriate footwear. Nursing home residents with diabetes need to undergo regular foot checkups with a doctor or podiatrist. These should occur at least once a year or more often if recommended. If caulouses or foot lesions develop, the resident should see a doctor or podiatrist for removal.

If a nursing home fails to provide proper foot care, even ordinary problems can get worse and lead to serious complications, such as amputation. If you believe a loved one has suffered through a painful and degrading amputation due to negligent foot care call Brent Wieand for a free, no obligation consultation.

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